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About My Art

miriam timbrelTitle of Piece: “Miriam’s Timbrel

First, I chose blue and pink from a jewel tones palette, and then added a bright yellow to evoke the shining sun that emerges with spring. The blue of the background represents the Sea of Reeds, and is mixed with white to symbolize Israel. I rolled out the ball into an oval shape, leaving it wavy like the sea. After forming the timbrel with the yellow and pink, I mixed those colors with the blue to create a tunic sleeve for Miriam’s arm and attached a small hand, delicate but strong like God’s mighty hand that redeemed the people.  While I was working, I couldn’t help but hum the song by Debbie Friedman (z”l), which was an inspiration for this piece. (Created for Women of Temple Sinai Getaway, March 2013)

Join me at  “The Colors of the Haggadah  art workshop to create your own piece!

Session Description: Each of us will create a portrayal of a scene or symbol from the Passover Haggadah, using brightly-colored polymer clay and a 4”x 4” tile.  You will be encouraged to use your hands, along with your words, to express your ideas. Below is an example of an Artist Statement, which illustrates how we will use color, shapes and texture to design our pieces. Supplies, including packing materials to transport your piece home, will be provided; NO previous art or ceramics experience is required.

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found object 1 webTitle of Piece: “One Breath

This piece was inspired by Flora Rosefsky’s Tower of Silence, her response to the biblical story of the Tower of Babel (Genesis 11:1-9). While I agree with Flora’s assessment that smart phones and other devices can create barriers between us, I believe we can harness cell phone technology to nurture relationships. I tried to illustrate this message with the found object, my first cell phone. When opened, a flip-phone automatically connects the caller, so it is in the open position. In addition, it is cradled in a hand in the position a person might hold it while speaking. Finally, the end of the wire on the thumb is pressing the green “call button,” which you would need to press in order to make a call with a flip-phone. I painted lightly over the red “end-call button” and pressed my thumbprint into the paint to represent that, in the past, I might have disconnected a call. Now, however, I am committed to answering calls and staying connected to the people I love. As the clay was drying, I painted the Hebrew letter alef on front of the glass. Alef—the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet—is a silent consonant. I think of it as the tiny breath that is exhaled when I open my mouth to speak. It is also the first letter in the Hebrew words “I” and “we,” and “one.” When we use the cell phone to connect, we are creating a oneness of two people. By focusing on the relationship, rather than the instrument of connection, we are building a stronger tower that reaches God. (Created for Melton’s Shivim Panim class at the Brill Institute, October 2013)

Join me at an  art workshop to create your own piece!

Session Description: Each of us will create a found object sculpture in response to the Tower of Babel text, using cell phones, paint, wire and clay.  You will be encouraged to use your hands, along with your words, to express your ideas.  Supplies, including packing materials to transport your piece home, will be provided; NO previous art experience is required.

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duck rabbit webTitle of Piece: “Duck Rabbit

I created this piece following a study session with one of my Rabbis Without Borders teachers, Rabbi Irwin Kula. While the original Duck-Rabbit was designed to test visual perception, this one serves as a reminder that when discussing any text, especially biblical narratives, personal perspective matters. If you can only see the duck and fail to see the rabbit—if you only see the story from one perspective—you risk missing other truths found layered in the text.

Join me at a study session to learn how to look for the Duck Rabbit!